Review: Hell Week by Rosemary Clement-Moore

Hell WeekHell Week (Maggie Quinn: Girl Vs. Evil #2)
Author: Rosemary Clement-Moore
Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers
Age Group: Teen
Source: Library
Good Reads  |  Amazon
Rating: 4 out of 5

Summary from Amazon:

MAGGIE QUINN IS determined to make her mark as a journalist. The only problem? The Ranger Report does not take freshmen on staff.

Rules are rules. But when has that ever stopped Maggie?

After facing hellfire, infiltrating sorority rush should be easy. It’s no Woodward and Bernstein, but going undercover as the Phantom Pledge will allow her to write her exposé. Then she can make a stealth exit before initiation. But when she finds a group of girls who are after way more than “sisterhood,” all her instincts say there’s something rotten on Greek Row. And when Hell Week rolls around, there may be no turning back.

If there is such a thing as a sorority from hell, you can bet that Maggie Quinn will be the one to stumble into it.

 

Rating

4 out of 5

4 out of 5

My Thoughts

The one YA author that I think deserves so much more love in the book blogging world is Rosemary Clement-Moore.  I know I’ve lamented this sad fact more than once, but she’s totally worth me getting on my soapbox once again.  Hell Week is the second book in Clement-Moore’s Maggie Quinn: Girl vs. Evil series.  Keeping up with series is not my strong point, but reading the sequel to Prom Dates from Hell was an excellent life choice.

This series follows Maggie Quinn, who’s one witty protagonist.  At the start of Hell Week, Maggie is starting her first year of college.  Maggie has aspirations to become a newspaper reporter, and has come up with a story idea regarding the Sororities of Bedivere University.  Soon Maggie is going through Rush to get the inside scoop on all things sororities.  However, as Maggie investigates the sororities, she starts to suspect that more is going on than meets the eye.

Clement-Moore excels at creating amazing main characters, and Maggie Quinn is a very typical Clement-Moore characters.  As mentioned above, she’s seriously quick-witted, and she can also be quite snarky.  She always has a humorous reply on the tip of her tongue.  Her voice was the most enjoyable aspect of Hell Week.  Maggie is never one to throw a pity party for herself, even when things get tough (and things sure get tough in Hell Week).  Maggie is quite independent, and she’s comfortable speaking her mind, which just makes me love her all the more.

Maggie is my favorite thing about this series, but Clement-Moore doesn’t skip on the secondary characters.  Each character was well-developed, from Maggie’s parents, and grandmother, to other sorority girls.  And of course I have to talk about Justin, a older college student who also happens to be Maggie’s dad’s TA.  I really liked Justin.  Is he swoon-worthy?  Not really, but I also think he is perfect for Maggie.  He’s got her back, and even though things about their relationship are a bit up in the air.

The best way to describe this story is that it’s pure entertaining.  It’s perfectly paced, and I couldn’t turn the pages fast enough.  Clement-Moore provides just the right amount of paranormal activity, without the story ever getting bogged.  The only thing that I think could have been improved regards a bit of information given towards the beginning of the story.  This bit of the story was really thrown in to makes explanations later in the story make sense.  But how Maggie started investigating this part of the story felt a little unfinished.  This is a very small complaint on my part, though.

Hell Week was typical Rosemary Clement-Moore.  The star of the book is definitely Maggie’s strong personality, but the plot, secondary characters, and paranormal elements all add up one fantastic read.  I cannot recommend Rosemary Clement-Moore enough!

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